Sunday, September 24, 2017

John Blackham Sr & Susannah Lees Blackham


John Blackham


Susannah Lees Blackham


John Blackham Gravestone


 Susannah and John Blackham



Susannah Lees Blackham

Susannah Lees
1830-1901

         Susannah Lees was born in Ashton Under Lyne, Lancashire, England, December 11, 1830 the fourth of eight children to John and Elizabeth Buckley Lees.  Ashton Under Lyne is in the southeast boarder of Lancashire about 7 miles northeast of Manchester.

        Lancashire County in the 1800's was known for its large cotton mills and many inhabitants were connected with the cotton industry.  Susannah was a cotton weaver and her father was a cotton spinner and her brothers, James and Joseph were cotton piecers. 

        P. Blinkton Baptized Susannah a Member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on July 18, 1848.  She was confirmed on July 22 by John Albiston.

         As a young woman, Susannah had a beautiful high soprano voice, and while in England she sang in the church choir and after reaching Utah, her voice could always be heard with the singers of Zion singing hymns.  Especially at Christmas time she lifted her voice with others who went about the town singing Christmas carols.  Once in England, as she was singing at a Mormon street meeting, Brother John Taylor laid his hand upon her shoulder and said, “Sister Susannah, the voices of your off-spring shall be heard in all corners of the earth.”  That promise has almost been fulfilled through her sons and grandsons preaching the gospel.  All have been and are good singers, and most of them have a tenor voice.  Many of her grandchildren, both girls and boys, have been endowed with this talent.
                
         On 21 April 1851 Susannah was married to John Blackham in England.  They made their home at 47 Victoria Street in Ashton Under Lyne, Lancashire, England, where they had two girls.  Elizabeth was born March 5, 1852 and Martha on the 8th of September 1853.

        John and Susannah decided to emigrate to Zion and they were registered to leave on the ship "Elvira Owens" in 1853 with John's brother, James and Susannah's parents and two younger brothers, George (13) and Josiah (11).  But for some reason John and Susannah had to wait two years and came on the ship "Samuel Curling" that departed from Liverpool the 22nd of April 1855.  Susannah's two brother's Joseph,(26) and John,(22) and John's wife, Martha Needham were also on the ship with them.

        They were very poor and came with the help of the Perpetual Emigration Fund.  The P.E.F. as it was known, was set up by the Church to fund the emigration of the poor.  Everyone was expected to pay back the money they had borrowed so others could also come to Zion.

        In a meeting at Liverpool before they left, Brother D. Spencer and Franklin D. Richards both prophesied that if the Saints would do right on board the S. Curling they would have a good voyage and not a soul would die, but if we would not do right it would prove the unhappy reverse to them.

        There were 581 members of the Church on board, with Elder Israel Barlow (the half-brother of Julia Ann Lockwood) a returning missionary was their leader.  The Saints were divided into seven Wards.  During the voyage there were several storms, with one that was quite severe.  Elder Barlow afterwards told some of the Saints that while the storm was raging he saw the ship surrounded by scores of angels, who stood in a circle around it with joined hands.  This was a testimony to the Saints that the Lord was watching over the ship, and that there was no danger.  There were no deaths on this journey.

        They arrived in New York May 22, 1855.  The emigrants continued by rail to Pittsburgh, then by steamboat on the Missouri River to Atchison, Kansas.  They were outfitted at Mormon Grove, Kansas on 4 August 1855. 

        John and Susannah joined the 8th and last wagon train company of the year 1855, with Captain Milo Andrus.  There were 461 people with this company, and this was a Perpetual Emigration Fund Train.
        
        As they traveled westward from Mormon Grove, the sound of the bugler aroused the Saints at six o'clock.  Families would then attend prayers, prepare breakfast and make everything ready to start the day's journey by eight o'clock.  En route, each teamster walked by the side of his wagon.  All able-bodied immigrants walked most of the way, and according to Captain Andrus they "rejoiced to be on their way to Zion." 

        Susannah and her two daughters made their beds at night on a rather small box, and they kept it all through the journey.

         One day as they were wending their way over the pioneer trail, Susannah noticed that her older brother Joseph was missing.  She hurried to Captain Andrus and reported the loss of the man.  He rode back over the trail for four miles, and finally found him under a tree.  He had dropped by the way, too ill to go on.  Captain Andrews placed him on his horse and took him back to camp.  But he was not strong enough to stand the hard rigors of the pioneer trail, and passed away before reaching the valley. 

        They were late in the season and while crossing the South Pass ran into some snow for several days and lost some cattle.  Many men women and children were almost barefoot and very destitute of clothing.  Thankfully it warmed up in a few days and they did not have any more snow.  By the time Milo's company reached Green river they were so depleted of animals that they were unable "to roll."  From there, the Captain dispatched two men to Fort Bridger in quest of animals to help them in their travels.

        Word reached President Brigham Young of the destitute condition of Captain Andrus' train and supplies and oxen were sent to help.  Despite their problems the company arrived in good health on 24 October 1855.

         As a pioneer woman, she was very thrifty, and did her share of the work.  The wool from the few sheep they owned, she washed, carded and spun.  She then wove it into suits for her five boys and dresses for her two girls.

         Her boys would go to the hills and gather rabbit brush, sagebrush, and other things, which she used for making the dyes to color the cloth.  The material was dyed a different color for each suit.  She always made them plenty large, as the homespun had such wonderful wearing qualities.  Her one son relates that the suit, which was made for him at the age of five, he still wore when he was twelve years old.

         At one time, shortly before there was to be a May Day celebration, she decided that her boys must have some new pants, so she had to get busy at once.  In the daytime she worked very hard to weave the Jeans, and made the pants at night by firelight.  May Day came and the five boys had their new pants to step out in.  She also made her husband a pair out of bed ticking, and in her own opinion, “They looked very nice.”
        
         Susannah was a professional hat maker.  The boys would gather the long clean straws together and tie them into bundles.  These were put away until early spring.  Then she would weave them into hats for summer, and make cloth caps for winter.  A pioneer friend by the name of Mrs. Hamilton, upon seeing one of these straw hats, desired one very much for her husband, so she waited upon Susannah at the birth of one of her children for one of them.  One year she made and sold five straw hats at one dollar apiece.  With this money she bought a pair of leather shoes for her husband.  This was his first pair of shoes since he came to Utah.  For her family she had also made shoes of woolen cloth with soles of rawhide.  She also sold some of these shoes about the little town.  In her spare time she made candles and soap, and other things, and when she went to Salt Lake to conference with her husband, she would take these things, along with the hats, and would sell them there.  It was while in Salt Lake to conference, that her mother and an old friend by the name of Mrs. Knot made and gave Susannah a new shaker bonnet made from tea straw.  She brought this shaker bonnet to Moroni, thus being given the honor of introducing the new style to the women.

         Susannah went through many hardships, along with her pioneer neighbors.  Once when her children were small, she was doing the family washing.  They were in very destitute circumstances, and she was so weak from hunger that she was unable to stand up to rub out the clothes, but was forced to kneel down upon her knees to finish them.  Sister Knot calling at her home, found her in this weakened condition, and calling some of the other sisters to help her, they went to the fields and gleaned a little wheat.  This they ground up in a coffee mill, made some cakes of the meal, and took her something to eat.
        
         While they suffered many hardships, yet they also had many happy times together.  Later, when the children were married and had families of their own, they would all congregate together at their mother’s home on Christmas Eve.  Each would bring something nice toward the feast, and they would have a very enjoyable time together, visiting, eating, and singing.  Among the songs they liked to sing were, “The Moon is up and in the Sky,” and “Christians Awake, Salute this Happy Morn.”

         Susannah and John had eleven children, raising nine of them.  Two died when they were small infants.  The children were Elizabeth, Martha, William, John, Josiah, Samuel, Susannah, Alma, Betsey, Benjamin, and Mary Ann.

         Susannah died at Moroni on 16 August 1901, at the age of 71, loved and honored by her large family and friends.


(From the files of Nida H. Donaldson)
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Could not read or write, signed her wedding certificate with an x.
BLACKHAM, John <1828>     S.Curling    1855
         Gender:      M      Age:  27     Origin:       Asthon Under Lyne         Occ:  Cotton Spinner
         Note: BMR, p.169; "Ordered from Great Salt Lake City" (BMR).
BLACKHAM, Susannah  <1831>     S.Curling    1855
         Gender:      F       Age:  24     Origin:       Asthon Under Lyne               
BLACKHAM, Elizabeth   <1853>     S.Curling    1855
         Gender:      F       Age:  2       Origin:       Asthon Under Lyne               
BLACKHAM, Martha      <1854>     S.Curling    1855
         Gender:      F       Age:  1       Origin:       Asthon Under Lyne

Ship: S.Curling
         Date of Departure:       22 Apr 1855        Port of Departure:         Liverpool, England
         LDS Immigrants: 581   Church Leader:    Israel Barlow
         Date of Arrival:    22 May 1855       Port of Arrival:     New York, New York
         Source(s):  BMR, Book #1040, pp. 169-191 (FHL #025,690); Customs #376 (FHL #419,652)
         Notes:        "DEPARTURE OF THE S. CURLING. -- The ship S. Curling cleared on the 21st ultimo, and put to sea on the 22nd, with 581 souls of the Saints on board, of whom 385 were P. [Perpetual] E. [Emgration] Fund emigrants, all under the presidency of Elder Israel Barlow, formerly pastor of the Birmingham and Warwickshire Conferences.  He is accompanied by Elder John Barker, late pastor; Elders John Robinson, Matthew Rowan, George W. Bramwell, Joseph Westwood, Thomas Caffall, Joseph Boath, John Perry, formerly presidents of conferences; Moses Thurston, travelling elder; also Elder William W. Willes, who is on his way home from an arduous mission in the East Indies; and Elder G. W. Burridge from Malta.  These brethren leave these lands with our confidence and faith that they will live to realize the blessings in Zion which they so fondly anticipate.   The sailing of the S. Curling closes up the through emigration from hence to Utah this season."

"EMIGRATION. . . . The ship S. Curling, S. Curling, master, arrived at this port on the 22nd ultimo; Elder Israel Barlow, president.  She had when she left Liverpool 581 passengers on board, and had an increase of three on the passage, and no deaths; thus she had a net increase of three.  Most of the passengers left on the 24th by way of Philadelphia, en route for the Valley; the remainder of those who were going forward, went on the 25th.  All in good health and spirits."

"EIGHTY-SEVENTH COMPANY. -- Samuel Curling, 581 souls.  On the twenty-second of April, 1855, the ship, Samuel Curling, sailed from Liverpool with five hundred and eighty-one Saints on board, of whom three hundred and eighty-five were P. [Perpetual] E. [Emigration] Fund emigrants, all under the presidency of Elder Israel Barlow, who had acted as pastor of the Birmingham and Warwickshire Conferences.  William Willis, on his return from a mission to India, and other prominent elders embarked on the Samuel Curling, which, after a safe and pleasant passage, arrived in New York on Tuesday, the twenty-second of May.  During the voyage three children were born, and as there were no deaths on board the net increase was that number.  Elder Peter Reid, who emigrated to America as a passenger in the Samuel Curling, in 1855, and who now resides in the Sixteenth Ward, Salt Lake City, told the writer some time ago that the ship encountered several storms in her passage across the Atlantic, but that she passed safely through them all.  In the midst of one of these storms the captain got somewhat disheartened, and declared to Brother Barlow, the president of the company of emigrants, that he, in his long experience as a seafaring man, had never encountered a worse one; he then added that the tempest had not reached its highest point yet, but that the next half hour would be worse still.  Brother Barlow, in reply, told the captain that the storm was nearly over, and would not increase in violence.  This bold remark of Brother Barlow made the captain angry, as he thought he knew more about the weather and the sea than anyone else on board; but on going into his cabin to examine his barometer and other nautical instruments, he found that Brother Barlow was right; the storm abated almost immediately.  Elder Barlow afterwards told some of the Saints that while the storm was raging he saw the ship surrounded by scores of angels, who stood in a circle around it with joined hands.  This was a testimony to the Saints that the Lord was watching over the ship, and that there was no danger.  Most of the passengers left New York en route for the Valley on the twenty-fourth, going by steamboat via Amboy to Philadelphia, where the emigrants were placed on the railway train, and left Philadelphia on Friday the 25th, about noon, arriving in Pittsburg on the morning of the twenty-seventh, (Sunday.)  The same day the P. [Perpetual] E. [Emigration] Fund emigrants of the Samuel Curling joined the like passengers who had crossed the Atlantic in the Chimborazo, and on the steamship Amazon they continued the journey to St. Louis, whence they proceeded to Atchison, Kansas.  Some of the Samuel Curling passengers remained in New York for the purpose of earning means to continue the journey to Utah.  (Millennial Star, Vol. XVII, pp. 280, 397, 399, 423, 424, 459, 461, 490.)"

"Sun. 22. [Apr. 1855] -- The ship Samuel Curling sailed from Liverpool with 581 Saints, under Israel Barlow's direction; it arrived at New York May 27th.  The emigrants continued by rail to Pittsburgh, thence by steamboat on the rivers, via St. Louis, Missouri, to Atchison, Kansas"

John Blackham Senior

John Blackham, Sr.
1827-1900
              John Blackham, Sr., the first child of Samuel and Martha Robinson Blackham, was born in the town of Heaton Norris, Lancashire, England on November 14, 1827.  Heaton Norris is a small town in the parish of Manchester.  
        Lancashire County in the 1800s was known for its large cotton mills and many inhabitants were connected with the cotton industry.  John was a cotton spinner by trade but his father was a "Smith" and nail maker. 
        Brother John Taylor and Cyrus Wheelock were among the missionaries that came to England and converted the Blackham family.  John Blackham was baptized by T.J. Schofield on April 4, 1849, and confirmed by John Albiston April 29, 1949.  His mother had joined in 1847, and most of his brothers and sisters joined but there is no record of his father ever being baptized.
        John married Susannah Lees April 20, 1851, John was 23 and Susannah was 20.  At this time neither one could read or write because they signed their wedding certificate with an "X" mark.  Both families were living on George Street in Ashton Under Lyne when they married. Plus both families were members of the Ashton Under Lyne Branch of the Church.  Susannah had been baptized several years earlier in July of 1848.
        They made their home at 47 Victoria Street in Ashton Under Lyne, Lancashire, England, where they had two girls.  Elizabeth was born March 5, 1852 and Martha on the 8th of September 1853.
        John and Susannah decided to emigrate to Zion and were registered to leave on the ship "Elvira Owens" in 1853 with John's brother, James and Susannah's parents, John and Betty, and two younger brothers, George (13) and Josiah (11).  But for some reason John and Susannah and children waited two years and came on the ship "Samuel Curling" that departed from Liverpool the 22nd of April 1855.  Susannah's two brother's Joseph (26), and John (22), and John's wife, Martha Needham, were also on the ship with them.
        They were very poor and came with the help of the Perpetual Emigration Fund.  The P.E.F., as it was known, was set up by the Church to fund the emigration of the poor.   Everyone was expected to pay back the money they had borrowed so others could also come to Zion.
        In a meeting at Liverpool before they left, Brother D. Spencer and Franklin D. Richards both prophesied that if the Saints would do right on board the “S. Curling” they would have a good voyage and not a soul would die, but if we would not do right it would prove the unhappy reverse to them.
        There were 581 members of the Church on board, with Elder Israel Barlow (the half-brother of Julia Ann Lockwood) a returning missionary was their leader.  The Saints were divided into seven Wards.  During the voyage there were several storms, with one that was quite severe.  Elder Barlow afterwards told some of the Saints that while the storm was raging he saw the ship surrounded by scores of angels, who stood in a circle around it with joined hands.  This was a testimony to the Saints that the Lord was watching over the ship, and that there was no danger.  There were no deaths on this journey.
        They arrived in New York on May 22, 1855.  The emigrants continued by rail to Pittsburgh, then by steamboat on the Missouri River to Atchison, Kansas.  They were outfitted at Mormon Grove, Kansas on 4 August 1855. 

        John and Susannah joined the 8th and last wagon train company of the year 1855, with Captain Milo Andrus.  There were 461 people with this company, and this was a Perpetual Emigration Fund Train.
        As they traveled westward from Mormon Grove, the sound of the bugler aroused the Saints at six o'clock.  Families would then attend prayers, prepare breakfast and make everything ready to start the day's journey by eight o'clock.  En route, each teamster walked by the side of his wagon.  All able-bodied immigrants walked most of the way, and according to Captain Andrus they "rejoiced to be on their way to Zion."
       They were late in the season and while crossing the South Pass ran into some snow for several days and lost some cattle.  Many men, women and children were almost barefoot and very destitute of clothing.  Thankfully it warmed up in a few days and they did not have any more snow.  By the time Milo's company reached Green River, they were so depleted of animals that they were unable "to roll."  From there, the Captain dispatched two men to Fort Bridger in quest of animals to help them in their travels.
        Word reached President Brigham Young of the destitute condition of Captain Andrus' train and supplies and oxen were sent to help.  Despite their problems the companuy arrived in the valley on 24 October 1855.
        John and Susannah settled in Salt Lake City on what is known as 5th West Street.  While living in Salt Lake they had their first son and third child, William, born October 31, 1856.
        At the October Conference of 1856, President Brigham Young asked for volunteers to go and relieve the ill-fated Martin Handcart Company.  John Blackham was the first man to respond, because he knew that in the company were his mother, sister Sarah, and brothers Samuel and Thomas.  President Brigham Young then dismissed the conference, and promised protection to them by the U. S. government.  At this time, John Blackham as working for Heber C. Kimball.  He happened to meet him, as he was on his way with what provisions he had gathered.  He said, “Brother John, where are you going?”  He answered that he was going to relieve the handcart company.  “Well then, come with me.”  They went to the tithing office where Brother Kimball supplied him with clothes, food, two oxen and a couple more men.  One was Cyrus Wheelock, an old sea captain, who with President John Taylor had converted the Blackham's to the Gospel in England
        The men placed their quilts, clothing, corn and food in the old government wagon and started on their errand of mercy.  The snow was 18 inches deep.  Brother Wheelock rode a horse.  When they reached the summit of “Big Little Mountain”, they saw smoke issuing from a distant grove of trees.  At first sight they thought it was Indians, but upon going nearer they saw it was the ill-fated Martin Handcart Company.  Brother Wheelock on his horse reached there first and heard Thomas cry out, “Here comes our Jack.”  Never had there been a more happy reunion.  Tears would flow from his eyes, as he would relate the story.  He said, “Never have I received a more welcome greeting.  When this help came they had no food except four pounds of flour for each person left in camp.  They had cooked rawhide to obtain some nourishment.  At one time they had buried 17 persons in a snow bank.  The survivors were so thin they almost looked like skeletons.  Little Billy Wareworth lost his father and mother.  But John’s mother, Martha, took him to her heart.  He rode with his little feet hanging over the side of the wagon and they froze, causing his death after they reached Salt Lake City.  All rode in the wagons, as they were too weak to walk.  President Brigham Young along with many others met them outside the city and tears of joy rolled down his face when he saw they were rescued.
         
        John and his family settled in Salt Lake and obtained work at Kaysworth, now Kaysville.  He walked to and from work each day and received for his wages one pound of flour a day.  Then he went to Fillmore with Charlie Kemp, a millwright, who later married his sister Sarah.  While working there on a millrace, he earned a yoke of oxen and a cow.  Later, when John returned to Salt Lake, he carried a flapjack to his family, knowing that they were in such destitute circumstances. 

        The seven Blackham families moved to Nephi, but not long after that, they were called by Brigham Young to settle Moroni under the leadership of George Bradley and his family.  They built a dugout on the bottom of the Sanpitch River, but later, upon the advice of President Young, they moved North upon higher land. 

        A son, John Blackham, Jr., was born to John and Susannah on August 8, 1859.  He was the first child born in the new settlement of Moroni.  They had seven more children in Moroni: Josiah, Samuel, Susannah, Alma, Betsy, Benjamin and Mary Jane.  Susannah and Benjamin died as children.
         
        The land was divided up into five-acre lots and he kept that land until his death.  In his later years, he planted potatoes in part of it; then gathered his grandchildren to help him harvest them.  It was a happy day for the children.  His grandchildren can well remember his voice calling to them, “Shift up, shift up,” when they became slack in their work.  Almost every day he would call, in his buggy and old gray horse, and take them riding often through the fields and in the hills to gather wild flowers.  He was a great lover of children. 
         
        He, with his three sons, were among the first to work on the Manti Temple, and he took an active part in the Black Hawk War, holding the rank of 2nd Lt..  He was in the Salina Canyon Engagement.  He was a stockholder and director in the Co-op Store and Land Company, and also Chairman of the Committee of the town cowherd, and hay meadow committee.  His duty was to see that all the hay was watered.  He was a member of the High Priests Quorum and served with Brother Lars Swenson for many years as head Ward Teacher of the Moroni Ward.  For 18 years he held the position of Sunday School Superintendent, also teaching the Primary Class.  It is told he had wonderful discipline and it became very quiet the moment he came in to the classroom.  He will always be remembered for his singing in the Sunday School.  He made one trip to St. George with provisions for the temple workers.

        He went on a mission to Michigan, but after 6 months was forced to return because of illness.  At one town, he and his companion were warned to leave the place or they would be tarred and feathered.  They left the next day for another small town.  While they were walking along the street a little girl come running and asked them if they were Mormon Missionaries.  When she was told that they were, she said, “Mother wants to see you.”  It developed that they had been Mormons for sixteen years and had not dared to let it be known. 

        John Blackham, Sr. married a second time to Elizabeth Catrine Nielsen in July of 1863, after more than 20 years they were divorced.  They had two children, John W. and Annie. 

        John died May 14, 1900 at the age of 78 in Moroni, Sanpete County, Utah.

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In the 1870 and 1880 U.S. Utah census John appears twice, once with his wife Susannah and once with his other wife Elizabeth.

BLACKHAM, John       <1828>         S.Curling        1855
          Gender:         M        Age:    27       Origin: Asthon Under Lyne    Occ:    Cotton Spinner
          Note:   BMR, p.169; "Ordered from Great Salt Lake City" (BMR).
BLACKHAM, Susannah <1831>         S.Curling        1855
          Gender:         F         Age:    24       Origin: Asthon Under Lyne
BLACKHAM, Elizabeth <1853>         S.Curling        1855
          Gender:         F         Age:    2        Origin: Asthon Under Lyne
BLACKHAM, Martha    <1854>         S.Curling        1855
          Gender:         F         Age:    1        Origin: Asthon Under Lyne
Ship:   S.Curling
          Date of Departure:     22 Apr 1855  
        Port of Departure:       Liverpool, England
          LDS Immigrants:        581     Church Leader:          Israel Barlow
          Date of Arrival:          22 May 1855   Port of Arrival: New York, New York
          Source(s):      BMR, Book #1040, pp. 169-191 (FHL #025,690); Customs #376 (FHL #419,652)
          Notes: "DEPARTURE OF THE S. CURLING. -- The ship S. Curling cleared on the 21st ultimo, and put to sea on the 22nd, with 581 souls of the Saints on board, of whom 385 were P. [Perpetual] E. [Emgration] Fund emigrants, all under the presidency of Elder Israel Barlow, formerly pastor of the Birmingham and Warwickshire Conferences.  He is accompanied by Elder John Barker, late pastor; Elders John Robinson, Matthew Rowan, George W. Bramwell, Joseph Westwood, Thomas Caffall, Joseph Boath, John Perry, formerly presidents of conferences; Moses Thurston, travelling elder; also Elder William W. Willes, who is on his way home from an arduous mission in the East Indies; and Elder G. W. Burridge from Malta.  These brethren leave these lands with our confidence and faith that they will live to realize the blessings in Zion which they so fondly anticipate.   The sailing of the S. Curling closes up the through emigration from hence to Utah this season."

"EMIGRATION. . . . The ship S. Curling, S. Curling, master, arrived at this port on the 22nd ultimo; Elder Israel Barlow, president.  She had when she left Liverpool 581 passengers on board, and had an increase of three on the passage, and no deaths; thus she had a net increase of three.  Most of the passengers left on the 24th by way of Philadelphia, en route for the Valley; the remainder of those who were going forward, went on the 25th.  All in good health and spirits."

"EIGHTY-SEVENTH COMPANY. -- Samuel Curling, 581 souls.  On the twenty-second of April, 1855, the ship, Samuel Curling, sailed from Liverpool with five hundred and eighty-one Saints on board, of whom three hundred and eighty-five were P. [Perpetual] E. [Emigration] Fund emigrants, all under the presidency of Elder Israel Barlow, who had acted as pastor of the Birmingham and Warwickshire Conferences.  William Willis, on his return from a mission to India, and other prominent elders embarked on the Samuel Curling, which, after a safe and pleasant passage, arrived in New York on Tuesday, the twenty-second of May.  During the voyage three children were born, and as there were no deaths on board the net increase was that number.  Elder Peter Reid, who emigrated to America as a passenger in the Samuel Curling, in 1855, and who now resides in the Sixteenth Ward, Salt Lake City, told the writer some time ago that the ship encountered several storms in her passage across the Atlantic, but that she passed safely through them all.  In the midst of one of these storms the captain got somewhat disheartened, and declared to Brother Barlow, the president of the company of emigrants, that he, in his long experience as a seafaring man, had never encountered a worse one; he then added that the tempest had not reached its highest point yet, but that the next half hour would be worse still.  Brother Barlow, in reply, told the captain that the storm was nearly over, and would not increase in violence.  This bold remark of Brother Barlow made the captain angry, as he thought he knew more about the weather and the sea than anyone else on board; but on going into his cabin to examine his barometer and other nautical instruments, he found that Brother Barlow was right; the storm abated almost immediately.  Elder Barlow afterwards told some of the Saints that while the storm was raging he saw the ship surrounded by scores of angels, who stood in a circle around it with joined hands.  This was a testimony to the Saints that the Lord was watching over the ship, and that there was no danger.  Most of the passengers left New York en route for the Valley on the twenty-fourth, going by steamboat via Amboy to Philadelphia, where the emigrants were placed on the railway train, and left Philadelphia on Friday the 25th, about noon, arriving in Pittsburgh on the morning of the twenty-seventh, (Sunday.)  The same day the P. [Perpetual] E. [Emigration] Fund emigrants of the Samuel Curling joined the like passengers who had crossed the Atlantic in the Chimborazo, and on the steamship Amazon they continued the journey to St. Louis, whence they proceeded to Atchison, Kansas.  Some of the Samuel Curling passengers remained in New York for the purpose of earning means to continue the journey to Utah.  (Millennial Star, Vol. XVII, pp. 280, 397, 399, 423, 424, 459, 461, 490.)"

Name: John Blackham Arrival Date: 23 May 1855 Age: 84(error) Gender: Male Port of Departure: Liverpool, England Destination: Salt Lake Place of Origin: England Ship Name: S Curling Port of Arrival: New York Line: 25 Microfilm Roll: 152 List Number: 376
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Journals of Matthew Rowan (Came on the Samuel Culing Ship also)
          . . . Tuesday, 17th.  Went to the office at 36 Islington and got my emigration ticket paying the balance for the same for Sister Smith and ourselves to New York by the Samuel Curling which amounted to, at the rate of B. 17.6, in total 11.12.6 the child was not chargeable.
          Wednesday, 18th.  This evening we went to the Adelphis Theater and saw three good plays.
          Thursday, 19th.  We got our luggage aboard the ship and slept on her for the first night.  I got a berth about midship, very good for air and light but much confused and thronged on account of the staircase being so near it.  Between Sister Smith and ourselves we had 9 Cwt, 11 pounds of luggage. I made her a present of the 6/4 ½ I paid for her railway fare from Sheffield to Liverpool.
          Friday 20th of April 1855.  We left the dock about 12 noon and went up the river Mersey to "Rock Ferry" to lie until the vessel was laden which was done by means of small boats coming alongside of her.  I did not see a tear [p.153] shed by anyone on board, all seemed very cheerful.  I should have recorded under date of yesterday that all pastors and presidents going out with the Samuel Curling met with F. [Franklin] D. Richards at 15 Wilton St. where we had some instructions given unto us by Brother D. Spencer and F. [Franklin] D. Richards and both prophesied that if we would do right on board we would have a good voyage and not a soul of us would die, but if we would not do right it would prove the unhappy reverse to us.  Elder [Isreal] Barlow, late president of the Birmingham and Warwickshire Conferences, was appointed the president of the ship and Elder [Joseph] Perry late president of the Wiltshire Conference and Elder Robinson, late president of the London Conference were appointed to act as counselors in fact we were all appointed to act as his counselors.  After partaking of some refreshment with Elder Richards we separated about 11 p.m. and I went and slept on the ship.  The Samuel Curling is the finest ship that has sailed from Liverpool with Saints. [p.154]  There are [-] souls aboard about 500 of whom are bound for G. S. [Great Salt] Lake
          Saturday 21st.  We lay all day in the river.  We passed the doctor on board about 2 p.m.   One family had to go back on account of their child having the measles or smallpox.  The surveyor surveyed the ship and pronounced it in good order.  F. [Franklin] D. Richards, D. Spencer and others of the pastors and presidents were on board the ship when she was surveyed &c.,  and left in the steamboat with the doctor &c.  At a council meeting of the pastors and presidents of conferences on board the ship in the evening I was appointed to take the presidency of the 5th Ward.  There being seven of them in number.
          Sunday 22nd.  The ship left the river today with a fair wind at a few minutes past ten a.m.  The weather was very fine and has been ever since Monday last.  A meeting was held in each ward at 8 p.m. or near to that time.  I chose 2 counselors [p.155] to act with me in my ward.  They were James Jardine & George Burridge.  The president of wards met with President Barlow in the capacity of a council meeting, and counseled with each other on matters.  We sailed near to Holyhead by the evening.
          Monday 23rd.  This morning we were nearly at a stand still the weather was so fair and calm.  We did not sail more than about 14 miles last night.  I got up by half past 5 a.m. and got my ward watered and breakfasted, then had prayer therein by 10 o'clock a.m. The strictest discipline is kept up relative to going to bed at night and rising in the morning.  Up by half past 5 a.m. and to bed by 9 p.m. prayers being over by 9 p.m.  It is the business of the presidents of wards to see that all in his ward are in bed by that time.  None to go up on deck after that except by the special permission of the president of the ward the one may be in. [p.156] There is a guard at each hatchway relieved every 4 hours, and there are 2 men appointed in each ward to wash and scrape the berths.  The ward’s cook in turns under the supervision of their respective presidents.  A good feeling prevails.  All goes first-rate along.  We prayed for a little wind this morning.  In the forepart of the day the wind blew a gentle breeze and we got along first rate.  We held a council meeting in the stern part of the ship in evening when several little matters were attended to.  After meeting our ward meetings were attended to.  There was a little seasickness on board.
          Tuesday 24th. We made good progress last night.  I attended to  my ward.  We held a general meeting of all the Saints on deck at 11 o'clock a.m., when the authorities on the ship were [p.157] presented and unanimously sustained and several little duties were explained and matters to be observed were pointed out to the Saints.  Elder [William] Willes [Willis] was appointed to gather the children together once a day and teach them that which will be for their good.  The captain scorns our system but loves some of our doctrines, at least he says so.  The wind fell today & in the evening it was contrary.  The captain jeeringly wanted us to pray and have the wind changed, then, he would believe in Mormonism.
          We held a council meeting at 6 p.m.  We were told while sitting that some sister was in the cabin with the captain and the cabin door shut.  Elder Barlow went slyly to see into the case.  Sickness was getting pretty prevalent.  [ON THE SIDE OF THE PAGE IS WRITTEN: "I called Elders Robert Micklejohn [Meiklejohn] and David Moffett as teachers in the No. 5 Ward."]
          Wednesday 25th.  The wind is still rather contrary.  A good deal of seasickness prevails. Very few but what were somewhat affected. [p.158]  My wife was a little sick, so was the child.  I was rather squeamish.  We are still in the Irish Channel.  We had a council meeting at 11 a.m.  I attended to my ward duties commencing at 5 a.m.  I felt very heavy at my stomach when going to bed tonight.
          Thursday 26th.  I was rather sick this morning and vomited a little water.  I did not attend my ward meeting this morning neither did I attend the council meeting which was held about mid-day, but my counselors did.  It was decided that no washing nor drying of clothes be done between decks.  David Moffett was appointed marshal of the ship.  Sailors out of a vessel which bore down upon us about 6 a.m. came aboard our vessel for news.  The vessel had not been home for 4 years.  She was coming at this time from the Sandwich Isles for Germany.  She was a German vessel.  She took 6 months or nearly so to come from the Sandwich Isles to where she met us. [p.159]  The sailors got several newspapers and Stars [Millennial Star].  Some from the captain and some from the passengers.  We sailed due west today, but the ship made but little progress as the wind was but gentle.  The ship rocked very much and much sickness prevails still.  We got clear of the Channel last night. My wife had to part with her breakfast this morning on account of sickness, but it was happy but temporary, and she served the company of us well all day.  The child was well.  I saw the captain order some straggling passengers on the deck while prayers were going on in the ward below to "go down to prayers."
          Friday 27th.  We were in a calm all day.  The captain says we are only one day’s good sailing from Liverpool and it is always so with him when he has a lot of praying persons and other hab-gabblings from Jerusalem on board.  "It is the case" said he, "as sure as Christ is in Israel."  We had our second ration of provisions given out today, which occupied the chief part of the day. [p.160]  Sickness does not prevail so much today.  The children are  playing as merrily on the deck at their little games.  The young men and women at their pastime and promenading, the sailors at their fun and frolic as though we were assembled as a picnic party on some large park or green.  A brother who can play the saxehorn is appointed to give the following signals for the following purposes:
          1st:  Three notes for general silence.
          2nd:  "Weep not for me Zion," for general prayer in wards.
          3rd:  "God Save the Queen," for lights to be put out at night.
          4th:  "Soldier's tear," for those engaged at night, such as the guards, to take to their posts and for all passengers are to get to bed.
          5th:  "Rosa May," to prepare to get water in the morning.
There are 12 men appointed to be on the deck to spy out what is going on between the passengers and the crew and to report anything that they may see wrong.  Our child, we observed today had got another two teeth in the upper jaw making six he has all together.  We are all well. [p.161]
          Saturday 28th.  We are still in a calm this morning and of course, making little or no progress.  I had a testimony meeting in my ward this morning at ten o'clock. The brethren were spirited in bearing their testimonies and a happy feeling prevailed.  All seem quite satisfied with their conditions &c.  There was a little confusion in the cooking of breakfast this morning but when my ward was going on with it, I got order restored.  There are in my ward 45 berths, 19 men, 35 women, 24 boys, and 31 girls, all together, 109 souls.  There are on board as passengers 578 souls about 500 of whom are going direct to the Valley of  Great Salt Lake.  All in my ward are Scotch, and those I used to labor amongst in Scotland, save two or three families.
          Sunday 29th.  This morning I held my ward meeting at 9 a.m.  There was a public or general meeting held on deck.  And agreeable to appointment we fasted until our first meeting was over which was between [p.162] 12 and 1 p.m.  Elders Barlow, Robinson, his counselor, and Willes [Willis], the secretary addressed the meeting.  The day was fine and calm, but in the evening the air freshened up and away we went at a good rate.  I had a meeting of my ward at 7 p.m. and administered the sacrament.  There was a good spirit in our meeting.  Several of the brethren spoke in the meeting.  All is union & concord!  There is very little sickness on board.
          Monday 30th.  The breeze is still up and we are going at the rate of I should say 9 knots an hour. My wife is unwell today; very much pained inwardly.  The nankeen for the tent and wagon covers was given out today and those who could of the company gave in their names as makers of them.  I paid for my 70 yards of nankeen £7.19.7. of which Sister [Ann] Brewerton  pays the one half.  The weather is fine.  I preached in my ward this morning at ten o'clock.  Had prayers in the evening. [p.163]  The ship ran at the rate of 14 ½ miles per hour in the morning and in the course of the day at the rate of 12 per hour.  I met with my ward in the morning.  All the beds were brought up on deck to be aired after breakfast.  The weather was fair.  All, with but very few exceptions, are in good health & spirits.  My wife is well today.  We lack not for music on board we have both violins, saxehorns, cornopians & accordions, playing merrily.  We indulged in but very little dancing, however.  The captain and crew are not so well pleased with us for preventing our sisters from associating with them.  The sailors say they shall have some of them at New York. Perhaps so.  It is hard work to get some of the sisters to keep away from the captain and crew.  There is a little sister in my ward whose name is A. H. who is perverse in this way.  In the evening the first tent cover made [p.164] under the superintending of Elder G. [George]  Bramwell was put up on deck, and the president of the ship, Elder Barlow, and his two counselors walked in procession through it followed by the 7 presidents of wards each with his two counselors, linked arm in arm.   Then came the secretary of the ship with 2 of the sisters who assisted in making the tent cover.  Then followed in the rear the tailors with others of the sisters who assisted in making the tent.  While walking in procession we sang "Praise to The Man" &c.  The sailors commenced making some fun at the time at which many of them gave way to vanity, which was instantly and severely reproved by President Barlow.  The tent was christened by President Barlow "one of the tents of Israel built on the Samuel Curling" to which the Saints responded by a long and hearty 'Amen'.  I met with my ward.
          Wednesday 2nd.  Last night we sailed at the rate of [p.165] between 14 and 15 knots an hour, this morning about ten knots an hour.  My wife fainted away after getting out of bed this morning and continued to be very ill until after midday.  It seemed to be spasms and severe gripping in the bowels.  I had a testimony meeting in my ward at half past 1 p.m.  Elder Barlow came among us and gave us some good instructions.  The tentmakers are as busy as bees, and as merry as crickets.  It is delightsome to see and hear them:  the love of God and each other, and the sweet melody of heaven swells each saintly bosom.  We had a few showers of rain today.  We are now (in the afternoon) in what in nautical parlance, is termed a "lull" in consequence of which the ship  lurches and has caused some of the too incautious to tumble downstairs &c. getting sprained feet and other mishaps.  Our captain has been practicing fortune telling today.  He is a droll Duke (our captain). [p.166]  I met with my ward in the evening.  I sang to my ward "O heard ye what news from the valley has come," with which I was well helped in the chorus.  During our meeting the ship rocked very much and the boxes and tins rattled about alarmingly.  I order my ward to make fast all their boxes, tins &c.  Some in other wards did not take this precaution and they had to get up on the night to do so and dry up the slops and such  like that had been spilt on the deck out of their vessels.  "A life on the ocean wave a home on the rolling deep." &c.
          Thursday 3rd.  This morning the weather was calmed very much, but the vessel rocked considerably.  Many lost their breakfast, some as they were carrying it from the galley to their berths and some when it was set before them on what they had for a table.  John Memmott’s breakfast was a total wreck. [p.167]  One man let his oatmeal porridge fall down the stairs.  It was a mercy he did not follow their example.  We were instructed to pray for the wind to became more propitious.  We did so, God heard, and the wind blew pleasingly.  We commenced to make our tent cover today.  I am well, my wife is  pretty well and the child is first rate.  I wish to have it recorded (and lest no one should do it I shall take this opportunity of doing so myself) that I can eat with pleasure the double more than what I could do with great pressing &c on land.  It is the same with others on board.  I wrote out a scale of rations for my ward to be distributed tomorrow, and on the following week.  I met with my ward this morning.  There is but little sickness or any other disease among us at present. I attended my ward meeting at ½ past 8. [p.168]
          Friday 4th.  I grew sickly this morning.  My wife was taken ill, and fainted in bed, but was soon restored.  I got little rest all night, and I had a little breakfast in bed then lay down a bit.  Then it was I grew sick.  I got up and vomited repeatedly, I lay down on deck for awhile, and my sickness left me.  I attended to the giving of the rations to my ward, and soon after grew sick again.  I went to bed.  My wife was poorly today.  The sea was very heavy and rough.  We ran 17 knots per  hour.  At 6 p.m.  J. [John] Memmott’s hat was blown over board and went back to Sheffield for ought I known.  Between 11 & 12 p.m. it was very rough and our marshal called up a few of the healthy of the brethren to assist in furling the "topsail."  The captain said he could have done perfectly well without them and he was seen calling down the ventilation "all passengers on deck" in order to put us in a game but although he was [p.169] captain he was not the "good shepherd" hence the sheep heard not his voice.  About 12 p.m. the ship it is thought ran at the rate of 20 knots an hour.  The boxes and tins rattled well.  Many were sick tonight.
          Saturday 5th.  I am still sick, sick, sick, and not able to take anything.  My wife happily is able to be up today.  It was very rough today.  The galley was set on fire today by a Brother who was boiling a piece of pork and the pot boiled over and the fat running on the stove away flame went.  The mate of the vessel threw the pot and all its contents into the sea but he did not throw the man over who owned the pot.  Curious!  I am. sure it was neither the pot nor pork that was the offense but this is none of my business.  I got up a little in the afternoon.  Many are sick today. [p.170]
          Sunday 6th.  A fast until after the morning meetings in the wards was observed by some.  The sacrament was dispensed in the ward meetings at 7 p.m.  There was no public or general meeting on deck today as it was rough weather.  I am still very sick in bed.  Brother Barlow announced today in a council meeting of the presidents of wards and their counselors that he had been in company with Joseph and Hyrum Smith and Willard Richards and their instructions were for the presidents of the wards to be fathers to the Saints and to attend to the health of the all on board.  "Let us do right and all will be well" is the voice of the Spirit unto us through the priesthood.
          Monday 7th.  I took a little brandy and water in the afternoon which had the effect of settling my stomach.  I then got a little pea soup, and oh! they were delicious to me and what is better.  They seemed to be just the thing my stomach wanted for there they sat until properly dismissed.  I get up in [p.171] the afternoon and paced the deck awhile but oh! it was piercingly cold but fair.  Rather out of our course being north northwest by north.  After pacing the deck awhile I felt as though I was a new man, I was so much better.  I went to bed early.  My wife and child are well.
          Tuesday 8th.  I get up this morning about 6 a.m.  I attended my ward meeting.  I was startled at hearing Elder Perry declaiming against giving heed to the sayings of the captain as he was trying to put us in fear by his lies in saying we were in great danger.  He rebuked evil spirits who were trying to annoy and destroy the Saints.  The wind shifted into a more favorable quarter this forenoon blowing us southwest.  I got some sago for breakfast, and it sickened me.  I vomited it.  Went to bed.  Got some potato soup after which I felt better and [p.172] was able to write a good bit in my diary.  Susan Lant fell downstairs and sprained her ankle and otherwise hurt herself.  Her mother is still very sick, she has been sick most of the time.  I saw an iceberg today to our left.  One was seen yesterday to our left.  It is still very cold but fair.  There is, I am told, a sailor in this vessel who is making his fourth attempt to get home to New York.  The last three attempts were failures!  He having been wrecked everytime; the last on the Banks of Newfoundland, not far from here.
          Wednesday 9th.  I got up free of sickness and kept so all day for which I was very thankful.  Very raw and foggy in the after part of the day.  We recommenced our tent making.  I attended my ward meeting at ½ past 8 p.m.
          Thursday 10th.  Last night on going to bed I was attacked by [p.173] the sick headache.  My old land curse following me on sea as well, despite of sea sickness &c. which have been so highly spoken of as a  cure for biliousness.  In the morning I took a dose of bilious powder which helped me.  It was raw and foggy all day.  Our course was west by north according to my pocket compass.  Sickness is again on the decline.  Elder Barlow has been very sick and poorly for some days past, but is a little better today.  The tentmaking is going ahead.  All is well, only a few of our young sisters who will be friends with our gallant captain and some of our brethren say he (the captain) is not so bad a fellow after all, i.e. when he has just given them such a glass of brandy.  Some would, I believe, call the Devil a complete gentleman for so small a compliment! as even an invitation to drink with him.
          Friday 11th.  I got up at 6 a.m. and attended to [p.174] my water distributing for ourselves and my ward.  I met with my ward in the morning.  A good feeling there.  We were becalmed from breakfast time till [--].  The captain caught some codfish and haddocks with the line.  The fog cleared away a little about 11 a.m.  It was agreed that no provisions be distributed today as the weather was not favorable to have it done on deck.  In the afternoon the wind freshened up and away we set northward.  I met with my ward in the evening.
          Saturday 12th.  We tacked about 4 a.m. and went southward all day, pushed on by a pretty stiff breeze; in consequence of which the vessel pitched pretty much, causing a good deal of sickness on board and a good many to fall down the hatchways and hurt and scald themselves with what [p.175] they might be carrying from the galley at the time.  Sister Smith of our company fell down the hatchway as she was coming down with a saucepan of gruel, and scalded herself on the one arm and bruised herself on other parts of her body.  The provisions were distributed today between decks as it was too rough for the job above.  I met with my ward in the morning, also in the evening.
          Sunday 13th.  I met with my ward in the morning.  A public meeting was convened at 11 a.m. on the deck.  Elder Barlow, Robinson, Mayben, Bramwell and Willis addressed the meeting.  Elder Willis's remarks were directed in an indirect manner towards the captain and crew concerning making free with the the sisters and against the [p.176] [SIC] sisters for their freedom with the captain and crew which was but ill taken by Brothers Barlow, Robinson and perhaps some others, they judging that his remarks were uncalled for.  The captain broke up the meeting (being piqued at Willis's remarks) by setting the sailors to shift the sails, and their yee hoes soon drowned the voice of the speaker.  I closed, with prayer, about ½ past 1.  We held our fast today until this meeting was dismissed.  We met at 7 p.m. in our respective wards and administered the sacrament.  We had a very good meeting in our ward this evening Elders Perry and Willis met with us.  The captain informed us that we were 910 miles from New York this morning, at 3 o'clock this morning.  We sailed with a fair wind all day but it was not very strong.
          Monday 14th.  About 2 a.m. I was awoke by [p.177] the noise and rattling of tins as the ship was rocking very much.  Some were bawling out about their beds being wet by the contents of slop pails, and other vessels which came down from the berths on the deck above them when they were upset.  I had to get up in a hurry twice to fasten mine , as they had broken away. We were flying at a good speed before a fair wind at the time.  We were about 700 miles from New York this morning, according to the captain for he said he had just past a milestone that told him so.  We went at a good speed today with a fair wind.  The tentmaking is going on briskly today above and below.  The beds were brought up on deck to be aired, the day being fine.  I met with my ward in the morning and in the evening.  My wife was very poorly this morning but got better during the day. [p.178]
          Tuesday 15th.  I was awakened this morning about 3 o'clock when the thunder was rolling and the lightning flashed at a pretty smart rate.  The rain fell in great plenty; and the sailors were pulling at the ropes and roaring in regular earnest.  Now all this has an effect upon the waking ear down below that is just enough to bear and at such a time it is clever work to keep one's self from being pitched out of one’s berth upon the deck.  Elder Bramwell came to my berth and whispered that I with the other presidents of wards were to join in prayer privately for the storm to cease.  This was done, and the storm did cease soon afterwards. I was afflicted of the sick headache and I went up on deck and vomited then returned to bed.  I was troubled with my stomach all day and vomited several times.  We run south all day.  My wife was sick  in the morning [p.179] but got better in the afternoon.  It was discovered that a child of 3 years of age was attacked with the smallpox in No. 6th Ward.  The president of the ship convinced the presidents of wards to take into consideration what was to be done in this case.  It was the belief of the presidents that it was not the design of God that this malady should spread amongst us and it was settled that the child and the other members of the family should be removed to the hospital forthwith, which was done.
          Wednesday 16th.  I was a little better today.  It is a fine day.  A steam packet passed us about 11 a.m. bound for New York.  We spoke with her.  She will have reported our whereabouts in three days from this time, in New York.  We are running northwest today.  I met with my ward in the morning.  Today there was a great to do made about a Brother [Samuel] Sully who is an under Marshall having seized a boy by the collar and did so much in the way [p.180] of chastising him that the boy was thrown into fits.  Some said the marshal struck the boy, but this the marshal denies.  At any rate, the boy bled at the nose from some internal injury and was otherwise very ill; and when he would see the Marshall or even hear his name mentioned, he would go into a fit, and exhibit great dread of him.
          Thursday 17th.  We run to the northwest all day at a good rate.  We had it foggy for a good part of the day but it cleared off by the evening.  It was said that we were between 500 and 600 miles from New York and here we were visited by some sparrows!  It is quite common for them for them [SIC] to do so, that is, to come as far out on sea.  The sun is setting this evening was beautiful.  It looked like a great body of fire resting on the sea.  I met with my ward in the evening.
          Friday 18th.  We are in the right course today.  About 8 A.m. Sister Meiklejohn wife [p.181] of Brother David Meiklejohn from Glasgow, and in the 5th Ward was confined of a fine daughter. Both are doing well at present.  The provisions are being given out today.  The boy that went into fits on Wednesday is still subject unto them when the least excited.  In the evening I was surprised to see two fiddles playing and Elders Perry and Willis dancing with a few sisters on the deck, and around them congregated a great number of the Saints and some sailors, the latter joining in the dance.  A few fish were caught this evening.  I attended my ward meeting.
          Saturday 19th.  We were becalmed this morning during which time the captain and several of the brethren caught some codfish. The captain cut up 5 of them that he had caught and gave them away in pieces to some of the Saints.  A Brother [Henry] Clucies sent me a bit of one he had caught.  We had a council meeting this morning in the stern of the ship. [p.182]  The dancing and dancers of last evening were censured by the president at the meeting this morning.  The president expressed that Elder Perry was asking something of him very importunately and a voice from behind Brother Barlow said "Let Elder Perry repent before he can have what he asks for."  Elders Perry and Willes confessed to their having repented of their dancing:  My wife was afflicted of the headache today.  The breeze freshened up about 9 a.m. and being fair all our sails was set and away we went very smoothly at the rate of 9 knots an hour.  The weather is very fine.  The cooking is sadly behind today and this causes a great bustle in the galley.  He earns his meal who cooks it today.  A collection was taken up in the wards to pay a man whom we had appointed to attend the fires &c. In the galley, today is a man, or rather a rascal at Liverpool, to lash [p.183] it properly in the ship, but he got his cash from Brother Robinson  before hand and he contented himself with lashing only a few boxes and we want to have £2 or £3  on hand when we arrive at New York to slip into the excise officer's hand so that we might get passing our luggage without being detained at that port, in the way of having any luggage examined.  I attend my ward meeting.  Ten shillings was what I got out of No. 5 Ward for the above.  There are some large families some of whom have nothing in the shape of money.  Others of them have such as 5 demies , 6 demies and a 1 [-].  Poor enough!
          Sunday 20th.  I attended to the cooking of some oatcakes in the morning, then my ward meeting.  Then a council meeting.  Nothing of any consequence was done.  The latter.  The wind blew [p.184] at a good rate and we dashed through the waves in bold and rapid manner.  The weather would not admit of us having a meeting on deck today.  The wards met at 7 p.m. when the sacrament was administered.
          Monday 21st.  Many get up early this morning to see the land, as it was given out at day- break that such was to be seen but as the sun got up the land went down.  What a disappointment!  The morning was beautiful, and many vessels were to be seen.  The wind was ahead of us in the morning.  In the afternoon a pilot came on board and agreed with the captain to pilot us in to harbor for the regular pilot fare on the pilot ground although he was many miles on this side of it. [p.185]  The pilot boats with their pilots run far out on sea in opposition to each other in getting vessels.  The evening was beautiful and many of the Saints get up upon deck and sang some of their Mormon songs in the true Mormon spirit.  I attended my ward meeting.  I examined some luggage that I had brought out of the railway luggage van at Liverpool for Sister Smith's it being addressed "Mrs. Smith passenger to Liverpool."  It consisted of a good leather portmanteau, a little square box and another old worthless box, broken in the lid.  They cautioned principally clothes and toys and school books for a young girl who as far as I could make out from letters in the same was at school at Liverpool.  The name of her parents is seemingly, Anderson, St. James's Square, Hull. [p.186] I did not know but the luggage belonged to some of us in company until we were near to America.  Had I known at Liverpool I should have returned with it to the railway station.  In a small "savings bank" in one of the boxes were three pieces of silver coin; one a shilling of George the 3rd’s reign, dated 1816, and has a quite new appearance.  Another is a French coin, stamped with the head of Napoleon, having on the head side "Napoleon Emperor," and on the other side "Empire Francois. A. 1811." and round the edge "Dieu Protage La France," it is a "2 Francs" piece.  (The other was a "2 Francs" piece, date "1833" with the inscription "Louis Philippe I Rot Des Francois.")
          Tuesday 22nd.  6 a.m. the land was sighted by a naked eye, and oh! how beautiful it did appear to the emigrant’s eye.  All were electrified by the cry of land.  Lame, old, young, sick, and all ran [p.187] up on deck to see it.  It seemed like a fairyland.  We first gazed upon what is called "Never Sink," then "Sandy Hook." then "Stratton Island," to the left, then we feasted our eyes upon the beauty of "Long Island." There we passed the doctor who is stationed there for the inspecting of passengers relative to the state of their health &c.  The company all passed without any exception, save the child that had the smallpox, and that the captain contrived to put out of sight until the examination was over which did not last longer than 15 or 20 minutes.  The doctor that came out with us the captain put out of sight so that he might not have need to sin his soul by telling a lie as to no disease being on board or from sinning still greater by telling the truth in the matter.  Elder Willis acted the part of the doctor in his stead.  All passed off well. [p.188] The steamer towed us into the harbor by the afternoon, and all the way up the (Hudson) river we were annoyed by sharpers, alas thieves, who came out in small boats, and "climbed up (another way)" on to our vessel, and would be in but our guard kept them at bay and hunted out of the vessel any that chanced to get in.  The captain engaged the steamer that towed us in for 75 dollars, which was only 100 dollars less than what the captain of the tug offered to tow us in for.  There was plenty opposition in this by steamers.  Yankee meets Yankee here. When landing at New York we were regularly beset by thieves, but the guard and the captain and crew kept them back and all the hatchway were guarded so that no stranger could possibly get down to our goods.  Oh with what audacity and unconceived of impudence do the New York sharpers go about their cursed business.  They are worse by far then their transatlantic brethren [p.189] at the Liverpool Docks.  They came in very "questionable shapes."  Some of them are hung and hooped in chains and rings of gold.  Mormonism can match them, however.  The captain is eloquent in extolling our conduct and propriety on board to the pilot, doctor, excise officers, and reporters.  He boasts that for goodness and healthiness, there never was a better ship load of people brought into port.  He and the crew wish we had further to go with them.  Our company has been so engaging, they express their regret to part from us. The captain gets us to sing to strange officials when they come aboard.  Oh! he is big about his passengers.  He was told at Liverpool what a life he would be led by our misconduct on board, during the voyage.  This, he states, he is prepared to speak against.  Our landing was reported in the New York papers today and our voyage and general conduct and appearance were commented upon.  We were called cleanly and orderly and our order was recommended to other emigrants &c. [p.190] [ABRUPT END OF THE JOURNEY ACCOUNT TO THE SALT LAKE VALLEY]
BIB:    Rowan, Matthew, 1827-.  Journals, 1853-1855. [LDS Church Archives, Ms 6084 1, fd. 1, vol. 2; Acc. #9323] pp. 153-190.  (HDA)
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John was baptized 28 April 1848 by T.J. Schofield and confirmed 29 April 1848 by John Albiston Jr.